A&F accused of obscenity

That’s right! Abercrombie and Fitch has just been charged with obscenity. If the FCC’s allegations of a “side boob” and buttocks didn’t get you upset, these allegations against A&F might.

According to the Associated Press,

Police confiscated two display photos of scantily clad men and a woman from a national chain clothing store and cited the store’s manager on a misdemeanor obscenity charge, authorities said. (Source)

Apparently, after a warning, the store refused to remove the photos that

showed three shirtless young men, with one man’s upper buttocks showing. The other image was of a woman whose breast was mostly exposed, authorities said. (Source)

Here’s my issue: the kids are going to be wearing the clothes in this fashion anyway, so what’s the big deal with a picture of an adult wearing them this way??

I’ll keep you posted on the developments of this case.

Read the full Story.

Update: February 5, 2008

Two words: Case Dismissed

Posters of scantily clad youths that were seized by police at an Abercrombie & Fitch store in a Virginia mall this weekend may be inappropriate for young children, but they are not obscene, according to legal experts.

Virginia Beach police apparently have agreed. On Monday, they dropped charges against the clothing company that markets to prep chic teens through sexually charged imagery.

Read this update. 

Comments:

  1. These allegations are some thing normal even with some popular brands like Abercrombie and fitch but the thing is that both ads and allegations both are acting for promoting the brand Abercrombie and fitch they are benefited either way.

    Comment by grahamford on February 6, 2008 at 3:27 am

  2. I think that Ambercrombie and Fitch is one of many companies that use sexually suggestive advertising to target young teens, in particular. Aeropostale, Hollister and American Eagle are among some of the other companies that come to mind, all deomonstrating to these teens how cool they’ll be in their products. This is just one of the many influences that teens deal with on a daily basis. As a mother of 4 teenagers, I would love nothing more than less of this type of advertising, it’s hard enough to raise moral, ethical, respectful and level-headed people without that type of influence. (I hate it when I sound like my mother!)

    Comment by Susanne Joslin on February 6, 2008 at 4:42 pm

  3. Well I guess legal experts ruled on this, that it’s not obscene. This case just goes to show you how there are so many diverse opinions and viewpoints on this. You can’t please everyone. That would be impossible. So, that’s just another reason why we need the legal system, so that we can put some kind of order into these kinds of circumstances.

    Comment by Tasia on February 6, 2008 at 5:33 pm

  4. The police officers who seized the posters probably have teenagers who shop there and dress that way.

    However, I found it interesting that Abercrombie & Fitch is not new to the world of lawsuits. According to CBS’ 60 Minutes, they were sued in 2005 for racial discrimination. Apparently, at that time, the image of A&F did not include African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos or females. The 60 Minutes article states:

    “…And the once venerable clothier, which outfitted everyone from Teddy Roosevelt to JFK, has undergone a makeover…

    The image of Abercrombie & Fitch is now party-loving jocks and barenaked ladies living fantasy lives.

    But all that fair hair and skin has made it a juicy target. It’s being taken to court, accused of racial discrimination in their hiring. Does Abercrombie’s all-American look exclude some Americans?

    “All-American doesn’t mean all-white,” says Jennifer Lu, a student at University of California, Irvine, and a former salesperson at a Costa Mesa, Calif., store. Lu and several other young people say they couldn’t get a job, or were fired because their look was not consistent with the store’s look.”
    See http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/12/05/60minutes/main587099.shtml

    The lawsuit resulted in A&F settling the class action suit and paying over $40 MILLION to Latino, African American, Asian American and female applicants and employees who charged the company with discrimination.

    Comment by Tami Lawley on March 6, 2008 at 7:25 am

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